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Tag Archives: reading suggestions

  • Watermark Authors’ Summer Reading List (Part 2)

    Part Two of our authors’ summer reading list includes fourteen more titles, picked by five of our authors. These are selections that they’ve got on their own to-read piles or recommend adding to yours. If you missed Part One last week, click here to check out the first eight picks.

    Wanda Adams (editor, A Sweet Dash of Aloha and A Splash of Aloha):

    WandaAdams_webWanda is a VERY prolific reader and ardent supporter of the annual Friends of the Library book sale! She gave us a lengthy list of suggestions that she's recently finished reading, now that she's moving on to working on her FotL haul:

    Hawai‘i: A Novel by Mark Panek (Lo‘ihi Press, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why I recommend it: Mark Panek is my favorite among local authors because of his historical bent.

     

    Adé: A Love Story by Rebeccah Walker (Little A / New Harvest, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Read it if you're looking for: A romance with depths.

     

    A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin (Bantam, 2002 reprint)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why I was interested in reading it: To see how it matches with the TV show. I think it’s just as good, if not better.

     

    The French House by Don Wallace (Sourcebooks, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it was on my reading list: Considering it for a possible book review article.

     

    A Shark Going Inland is My Chief by Pat Kirsch (University of California Press)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I enjoyed it: I love science and Pat's a friend.

     

    Clear Englebert (Feng Shui for Hawaii and Feng Shui for Hawaii Gardens):

    Author and feng shui expert Clear EnglebertOn my list (currently reading): Landscaping with Conifers and Ginkgo for the Southeast by Tom Cox & John Ruter (University Press of Florida, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I’m an avid gardener myself and this book will be of interest to other local gardeners. It's published by the University Press of Florida, and when they publish a gardening book, Hawaii gardeners should take note. Several times a year I write reviews of tropical horticulture books for the West Hawaii Today newspaper, and this book will be included in my next review. It's a superior book with many color photographs and the plants that are recommended will do well in Hawaii (somewhere). I recommend prostrate conifers (such as juniper) for many local gardens as graceful and unique groundcovers.

     

    I suggest: My Ideal Bookshelf by Thessaly La Force, editor & Jane Mount, illustrator (Little, Brown and Company, 2012)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: I borrowed this book to read, and just finished it. It's a very unique book—every other page is some expert's favorite dozen (or so) books. The text on the facing page is by the expert (such as Malcolm Gladwell) explaining why those books were chosen. The authors invite people to photograph their own favorite books and say why those books were picked. This book provided much valuable research for a presentation I’m working on, "How to Build and Maintain a Home Library in Hawaii," as well as inspiring me with many new book suggestions for my personal reading. I highly recommend it to everyone.

     

    Darien Gee (Writing the Hawaii Memoir; contributor, Don’t Look Back):

    DarienGee_headshotOn my reading list: Daughters of Fire by Tom Peek (Koa Books, 2012)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it’s on my list: This has been on my to-be-read pile for a year, and I'm looking forward to finally having the time to read it! Written by fellow Big Island author and writing instructor Tom Peek, Daughters of Fire looks like a gripping summer read.

     

    I suggest: The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work by Shawn Achor (Crown Business, 2010)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: The one key to success that everyone overlooks—your ability to find happiness in what you do—leads to more happiness and success in other areas of your life. Great case studies, information and inspiration. I highly recommend for anyone looking to make changes this summer.

     

    Fran Kirk (The Society of Seven)

    I suggest: Ghost Train to the Eastern Star (Houghton Mifflin, 2008) and The Happy Isles of Oceania (Putnam Pub Group, 1992) both by Paul Theroux

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: Paul is a GREAT WRITER. Couldn't get enough of him so I read two in a row.

     

    Dr. Rosalie Tatsuguchi (Why Smart People Do the Same Dumb Things):

    1-Tatsuguchi-web--0017-retouchedOn my list (currently reading): The Complete Book of Five Rings: Miyamoto Musashi, annotated and edited by Kenji Tokitsu (Shambala Publications, 2010)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I'm reading this edition because it’s more complete than other editions of Five RingsFive Rings still has so much influence on our cultural thinking and actions—not just Japanese. It has a lot of relevance for my new book, which I’m currently working on, Why Smart Men Do the Same Dumb Things.

     

    Also on my reading list: A Fighting Chance by Elizabeth Warrren (Metropolitan Books, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I want to read this because I admire Elizabeth Warren and want to understand how she thinks and how she matches her actions to her thoughts.

     

    Also on my reading list: Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power by Rachel Maddow (Crown, 2012, hardcover; Broadway Books, 2013, softcover)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I love Rachel Maddow on MSNBC and wanted to understand how she collects and analyzes data, and puts it all together.

  • Watermark Authors’ Summer Reading List (Part 1)

    We asked our authors what books they've got on their summer reading list and what they’d suggest you to add to your list. As you might guess, these writers are also voracious readers and were enthusiastic about sharing—some gave us more than one pick!—so we’ve had to split our list into two parts. Here are eight suggestions from six of our authors. (Check in next week for more suggestions!)

    Karen Anderson (The Hawaii Home Book)

    KarenAndersonOn my reading list: The Illustrated Gettysburg Reader: An Eyewitness History of the Civil War's Greatest Battle by Rod Gragg (Regnery Publishing, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I am planning a trip to Gettysburg and want to read up about the battle. This is a recently published book that includes rare, first-hand accounts, letters, speeches and article by the people who lived through the three-day conflict in 1863.

     

    Gov. Benjamin Cayetano (BEN: A Memoir)

    BenCayetano_WebI suggest: The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A. Caro (Knopf Doubleday, 1975)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: I've reread this book at least once every other year since I bought it in 1980. Fascinating story about Robert Moses, a powerful public official who virtually built New York.

     

    Frances Kakugawa (Kapoho: Memoir of A Modern Pompeii; Mosaic Moon; the Wordsworth the Poet series):

    fhk_webOn my reading list: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami (Knopf, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I consider Murakami one of the best authors out of Japan. He was a strong contender for the Nobel Prize this year. I found his last book IQ84 a masterpiece so am eagerly waiting for his August release of Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki.

     

    Marion Lyman-Mersereau (Eddie Wen’ Go; contributor, Don’t Look Back):

    marion_hdst-(for-web)On my reading list: Under the Blood-Red Sun by Graham Salisbury (Laurel Leaf, 2005)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I’m on a mission to read award-winning YA literature.

     

    I suggest (and am also re-reading!): The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (Harper Perennial Modern Classics, reissued 2008)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why I recommend it: I love what she's done with each character's unique voice in a separate chapter.

     

    Christine Thomas (editor, Don’t Look Back):

    ChristineThomas_webOn my reading list: The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (Little, Brown and Company, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I've been trying to find time to finish this Booker Prize-winning novel from last year. It's a beast of book, more than 800 pages, and immediately transports you to the New Zealand gold rush around the time my husband's great-great grandfather was there making his way in the world.

     

    Lance Tominaga (The Hawaii Sports Trivia Challenge; A Prophecy Fulfilled)

    I suggest: Showtime: Magic, Kareem, Riley, and the Los Angeles Lakers Dynasty of the 1980s byJeff Pearlman (Gotham, 2014)

    LanceTominagaFiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: I’m not a fan of the Los Angeles Lakers, but I still regard their “Showtime” teams of the 1980s to be the most entertaining product in the history of basketball. Big stars, bigger egos and the pressure to win – all wrapped neatly in Hollywood glitz – make for compelling storytelling. Author Jeff Pearlman dug deep to uncover a lot of behind-the-scenes anecdotes, and he presents the history of this team in a way that is readable and engaging. It is not only the authoritative look at the 1980s Lakers, it is the finest book I’ve read about any NBA franchise – even better than David Halberstam’s The Breaks of the Game.

     

    I also suggest: Any Given Number—Who Wore it Best, from 0 to 99 by Sports Illustrated (Sports Illustrated, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: Which athlete is the greatest to ever wear number 24? Is it Kobe Bryant? Willie Mays? Ken Griffey Jr. or Jeff Gordon? Written by the staff at Sports Illustrated, this is a fun read for even the most casual of sports fans. From 0 to 99, the book selects the top athletes associated with each number, and lists the deserving also-rans as well. It’s light reading, to be sure, loaded with photos and graphics. But it’s certain to generate debates within your group of sports-loving friends.

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