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Tag Archives: Arnold Hiura

  • Mom & Pop Stores

    Like movie sets from a bygone era, small mom-and-pop stores still dot the local landscape, from quiet country roads to busy city streets on every Hawaiian island. The “newer” ones—simple cinder block structures—are themselves mid-century relics. The original plantation-era stores are truly vintage wooden buildings, well worn with age. …People fondly remember patronizing these stores as children entering a dream world filled with cold sodas, ice cakes, candies, pastries and ice cream. Popular snacks included: Tomoe Ame, milk candy, button candy, rock candy, dried abalone, Bazooka bubble gum, dried ika (squid), sour lemon and ginger chunks. Some stores specialized in shave ice or various types of “crack seed” stored in large glass jars. One’s purchase was placed into a small brown paper bag that old-timers would always lick to enjoy the last bit of salty goodness off of the insides of the bags. Some stores even had wooden porches and benches out front where customers could sit and enjoy a cold soda, ice cream or shave ice, and talk story.

    —Arnold Hiura, From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now

    Photo: Paauilo Store, Highway 19, Hilo by Dawn Sakamoto Paiva Photo: Paauilo Store, Highway 19, Hilo by Dawn Sakamoto Paiva
  • FOOD FRIDAY: A Porky Pair from From Kau Kau to Cuisine

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and NowFrom Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu of KTA SuperStores and Jason Takemura of Pagoda Floating Restaurant and Hukilau Honolulu, is a unique culinary guide drawing out the connections between old, plantation-era favorites and new, innovative modern cuisine. While food historian Arnold provides a background to what, why and how we eat in Hawaii, Derek and Jason team up to present 30 pairs of recipes. Each pair matches a “Then” dish from Derek—a classic plantation or traditional local-style favorite—with a “Now” dish from Jason—a reinterpretation of Derek’s version or a new creation drawn from the same ingredients or cooking style.

    On this Food Friday, we present a pork-tastic pair: Classic Shoyu Pork from Derek and a modern spin on the manapua from Jason.

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: Shoyu Pork and Pork Belly Bao Bun Sliders

    Shoyu Pork by George Yoshida and Derek Kurisu

    I remember my family receiving pork from the “buta kau kau man” who would come to neighborhood homes and pick up slop once or twice a week (see page 30). In return, he would periodically bring everybody a piece of pork as a way of saying thanks. That pork was so goodI really looked forward to it! To this day, I love local pork, which is leaner and more flavorful than Mainland pork. This is another recipe I learned from my buddy, George Yoshida. Here on the Big Island, a lot of our plantations grew sugar. But on the other islands, they grew a lot of pineapple. The flavor goes well with pork, so we often use it for cooking with ham or spare ribs. I like to use it for shoyu pork—with the shoyu, it makes a unique flavor and the juice helps tenderize the pork. -DK

    • 5 pounds pork belly (or boneless pork shoulder roast, cut in half)
    • 1 cup shoyu
    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1 cup pineapple juice
    • 5 slices fresh ginger

    In a deep pot, cover pork with water and boil for 1 hour. Discard water and rinse pork. Slice pork into 2-inch pieces and, in the same pot, combine with remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil and continue to simmer, about 45 minutes, until tender.

    Serves 8 to 10.

     

    Braised Pork Belly Bao Bun “Sliders” by Jason Takemura

    Growing up in Hawai‘i, everybody loves to eat manapua. They’re sort of like SPAM® musubi—the kind of grab-and-go food perfect for a snack or quick meal. Instead of serving plain manapua in the restaurant, we put this spin on the classic Island favorite. We started with some of the Asian ingredients and flavors that I learned at Chai’s and adapted them to our needs and tastes. The secret is our braised pork, which goes really well with the bao buns. Sliders are really popular these days—no need to cut them in half or anything, they’re all individual servings. -JT

    • 2 pounds pork belly, skin removed
    • Pork Marinade (recipe follows)
    • 4 tablespoons hoisin sauce
    • 2 teaspoons sriracha (or other hot sauce )
    • ½ cup Kim Chee, chopped (see recipe, page 154)
    • 1 cup thinly sliced won bok
    • ½ cup finely julienned Fuji apple
    • ½ cup julienned green onions (reserve bottoms and stems for marinade)
    • 12 fresh bao buns, steamed and warmed

    Pork Marinade

    • 1½ cups shoyu
    • 1 cup sugar
    • ½ cup water
    • 2 pieces star anise
    • 1 3-inch piece ginger
    • 4 stalks green onion, white part only
    • 5 cloves garlic, whole
    • Pinch crushed red chili flakes

    Cut pork belly into a 2-inch by 2-inch by 8-inch block. Combine marinade ingredients and marinate pork overnight (8 to 12 hours), turning the pork over every 4 hours.

    Preheat oven to 325˚F. Transfer pork and marinade into an oven-safe pan. Cover pan with foil. Place in the oven and braise for 3 hours. Remove from oven, remove foil and allow to cool, with the braising liquid, before refrigerating until ready to use. Remove cold pork from the liquid and slice crosswise ¼-inch thick. Reserve braising liquid.

    In a sauce pan, heat sliced pork belly in the reserved braising liquid. Mix hoisin and sriracha together and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix won bok, apples and chopped kim chee together. Spread 1 teaspoon of hoisin-sriracha sauce in each warm, softened bao bun. Place 2 to 3 slices of pork per bun, topped with the kim chee slaw. Garnish with green onions.

    Makes 12 sliders.

    For more delicious pairings like this one, pick up a copy of From Kau Kau to Cuisine at our online store or your local bookshop. Go grind!

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now
    by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu and Jason Takemura
    Hardcover, 196 pages

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  • Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association Names From Kau Kau to Cuisine Islands’ Best Cookbook

    2014 Ka Palapala Po‘okela Award winners, with HBPA president David DeLuca and ceremony emcee Howard Dicus. 2014 Ka Palapala Po‘okela Award winners, with HBPA president David DeLuca and ceremony emcee Howard Dicus.

    Watermark Publishing has received the Award of Excellence, the top honor, in the Cookbooks category of the annual Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association’s Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards. The winning book is From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now by food historian Arnold Hiura, featuring traditional and contemporary recipes by Derek Kurisu of KTA SuperStores and Jason Takemura of Pagoda Floating Restaurant and Hukilau Honolulu. The awards were announced at ceremonies held on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at the East-West Center.

    The competition’s judges praised From Kau Kau to Cuisine for connecting Hawai‘i’s past and present through side-by-side pairings of plantation-era and modern-day dishes. Author Arnold Hiura, they said, “masterfully ties these recipes together with interesting histories on Hawai‘i’s culinary evolution and illustrates how trends in modern cuisine—sustainable, foraged, nose-to-tail eating—are actually old practices that were adopted out of necessity in plantation and war-era Hawai’i. Sharing food is joyful, and From Kau Kau to Cuisine is a joy to read and share.”

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now is Arnold’s fourth book with Watermark Publishing. His two previous cookbooks, Kau Kau: Cuisine and Culture in the Hawaiian Islands and The Blue Tomato: The Inspirations Behind the Cuisine of Alan Wong, co-written with Chef Alan Wong, were also recipients of the Ka Palapala Po‘okela Award of Excellence in Cookbooks.

    This marks the sixth consecutive year that a Watermark Publishing title has received the Award of Excellence in Cookbooks. In addition to Arnold’s books, previous years’ recipients were A Splash of Aloha: A Healthy Guide to Fresh Island Seafood (2013) and A Sweet Dash of Aloha: Guilt Free Hawai‘i Desserts and Snacks (2012), both by Kapi‘olani Community College, and The Island Bistro Cookbook by Chef Chai Chaowasaree (2009).

    In addition to Watermark Publishing’s own award, two clients from our Legacy Isle Publishing division also received honors. HONOLULU Magazine and Paradise of the Pacific: 125 Years of Covers by A. Kam Napier, Kristin Lipman, Michael Keany and Erik Ries, released under the Legacy Isle imprint, was presented with the Award of Excellence in the Illustrative/Photographic Books category. WCIT Architecture received Honorable Mentions for ‘A‘ama Nui: Guardian Warrior Chief of Lalakea, released under WCIT’s Mo‘o Studio imprint, in both the Children’s Hawaiian Culture and Children’s Literature categories. These are the first Ka Palapala Po‘okela wins for Legacy Isle clients. Legacy Isle Publishing provides publishing services to clients interested in producing non-fiction or children’s books specifically for the Hawai‘i market.

    Each year, the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association presents the Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards to recognize and honor the best of Hawai‘i book publishing from the previous year. “Ka Palapala Po‘okela” literally translated from Hawaiian means “excellent manuscript. ”

  • Come. We Go Kau Kau.

    From Kau Kau to CuisineOur newest book, From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now (by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu and Jason Takemura), will be hitting bookstores at the end of the month. It's currently available for purchase at our online store.

    In From Kau Kau to Cuisine, food historian Arnold Hiura provides the fascinating backstory of Hawai‘i’s culinary journey from roots in tight-knit communities to how—and what—Islanders eat today. Arnold points out, for instance, that common foods once consumed out of necessity, such as offal cuts or native plants, have once again become popular. The buzzwords of modern cuisine—sustainable, homegrown, foraged—are in fact age-old practices; many old-timers never stopped sourcing, cooking and eating their foods in these ways.

    Chef Jason Takemura, Arnold Hiura and Derek Kurisu. Photo by Eloise Hiura. Chef Jason Takemura, Arnold Hiura and Derek Kurisu. Photo by Eloise Hiura.

    In addition, Big Island television personality and KTA Super Stores executive vice-president Derek Kurisu and O‘ahu executive chef Jason Takemura of Hukilau Honolulu and Pagoda Floating Restaurant, have teamed up to present 30 pairs of recipes. Each pair matches a “Then” dish from Derek—a classic plantation or traditional local-style favorite—with a “Now” dish from Chef Jason—a reinterpretation of Derek’s version or a new creation drawn from the same ingredients or cooking style. The result: Grilled ‘Opihi are reimagined as Baked Oysters with Truffle Hollandaise; Kabocha with Dried Ebi evolves into Roasted Kabocha Risotto; Portuguese Sausage–Hamburger Patty Loco Moco is remade as Sake–Soy-Braised Short Rib Loco Moco. Each dish is accompanied by mouth-watering color photography, while accompanying features offer tips on step-by-step processes.

    We'll also be kicking off the book release with a talk story and tasting event at the Pagoda Floating Restaurant International Ballroom. This event is part of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii's "Inspired Food" series (the last event featured Kau Kau author Arnold Hiura and Chef Alan Wong discussing Chef Alan's book, The Blue Tomato) and is a fundraiser for the Center.

    The event will take place on Saturday, February 8 at 5:30pm. (Doors open at 5pm, validated $3 parking at the Ross Dress for Less parking lot on Kanunu St.) Tickets are $75, and a limited number of VIP reserved tables are available for $2000 (10 seats). Each ticket includes a copy of the new release From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now and access to tasting stations featuring seven different dishes from the book. VIP guests enjoy reserved seats, table service and wine.

    Want to see what guests will dine on?

    From “Then” — Kabocha and Dried Ebi (Pumpkin and Dried Shrimp)
    From “Now” — Roasted Kabocha Risotto

    KabochaPair_large

    From “Then” — Shoyu Pork
    From “Now” — Braised Pork Belly Bao Bun “Sliders”

    PorkPair_large

    From “Then” — Poke & Surimi Patties (Fishcake Patties)
    From “Now” — Shiitake & Spinach Dynamite-Crusted Opah

    FishPair_large

    To purchase tickets, call the JCCH at (808) 945-7633, ext. 28 or email programs@jcch.com. Space is limited, so reserve your spot now!

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