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Watermark Authors’ Summer Reading List (Part 1)

We asked our authors what books they've got on their summer reading list and what they’d suggest you to add to your list. As you might guess, these writers are also voracious readers and were enthusiastic about sharing—some gave us more than one pick!—so we’ve had to split our list into two parts. Here are eight suggestions from six of our authors. (Check in next week for more suggestions!)

Karen Anderson (The Hawaii Home Book)

KarenAndersonOn my reading list: The Illustrated Gettysburg Reader: An Eyewitness History of the Civil War's Greatest Battle by Rod Gragg (Regnery Publishing, 2013)

Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

Why it’s on my list: I am planning a trip to Gettysburg and want to read up about the battle. This is a recently published book that includes rare, first-hand accounts, letters, speeches and article by the people who lived through the three-day conflict in 1863.

 

Gov. Benjamin Cayetano (BEN: A Memoir)

BenCayetano_WebI suggest: The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A. Caro (Knopf Doubleday, 1975)

Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

Why I recommend it: I've reread this book at least once every other year since I bought it in 1980. Fascinating story about Robert Moses, a powerful public official who virtually built New York.

 

Frances Kakugawa (Kapoho: Memoir of A Modern Pompeii; Mosaic Moon; the Wordsworth the Poet series):

fhk_webOn my reading list: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami (Knopf, 2014)

Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

Why it’s on my list: I consider Murakami one of the best authors out of Japan. He was a strong contender for the Nobel Prize this year. I found his last book IQ84 a masterpiece so am eagerly waiting for his August release of Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki.

 

Marion Lyman-Mersereau (Eddie Wen’ Go; contributor, Don’t Look Back):

marion_hdst-(for-web)On my reading list: Under the Blood-Red Sun by Graham Salisbury (Laurel Leaf, 2005)

Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

Why it’s on my list: I’m on a mission to read award-winning YA literature.

 

I suggest (and am also re-reading!): The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (Harper Perennial Modern Classics, reissued 2008)

Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

Why I recommend it: I love what she's done with each character's unique voice in a separate chapter.

 

Christine Thomas (editor, Don’t Look Back):

ChristineThomas_webOn my reading list: The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (Little, Brown and Company, 2013)

Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

Why it’s on my list: I've been trying to find time to finish this Booker Prize-winning novel from last year. It's a beast of book, more than 800 pages, and immediately transports you to the New Zealand gold rush around the time my husband's great-great grandfather was there making his way in the world.

 

Lance Tominaga (The Hawaii Sports Trivia Challenge; A Prophecy Fulfilled)

I suggest: Showtime: Magic, Kareem, Riley, and the Los Angeles Lakers Dynasty of the 1980s byJeff Pearlman (Gotham, 2014)

LanceTominagaFiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

Why I recommend it: I’m not a fan of the Los Angeles Lakers, but I still regard their “Showtime” teams of the 1980s to be the most entertaining product in the history of basketball. Big stars, bigger egos and the pressure to win – all wrapped neatly in Hollywood glitz – make for compelling storytelling. Author Jeff Pearlman dug deep to uncover a lot of behind-the-scenes anecdotes, and he presents the history of this team in a way that is readable and engaging. It is not only the authoritative look at the 1980s Lakers, it is the finest book I’ve read about any NBA franchise – even better than David Halberstam’s The Breaks of the Game.

 

I also suggest: Any Given Number—Who Wore it Best, from 0 to 99 by Sports Illustrated (Sports Illustrated, 2014)

Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

Why I recommend it: Which athlete is the greatest to ever wear number 24? Is it Kobe Bryant? Willie Mays? Ken Griffey Jr. or Jeff Gordon? Written by the staff at Sports Illustrated, this is a fun read for even the most casual of sports fans. From 0 to 99, the book selects the top athletes associated with each number, and lists the deserving also-rans as well. It’s light reading, to be sure, loaded with photos and graphics. But it’s certain to generate debates within your group of sports-loving friends.