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Watermark Publishing Blog

  • Eddie Wen' Go Comes Alive!

    Eddie Wen' Go at The Hawaii TheatreEddie Wen' Go: The Story of the Upside-Down Canoe, Marion Lyman-Mersereau's captivating children's book about the courageous Eddie Aikau, told by the sea creatures who watched as the voyaging canoe Hokule'a overturned during a storm and the brave waterman Aikau paddled off for help, will be staged next month at the Hawai'i Theatre as part of the HTC 'Ohana Series.

    Marion Lyman-Mersereau, a crewmate aboard Hokule'a during its fateful voyage, wrote Eddie Wen' Go to share Aikau's legacy of courage and sacrifice. It has long been her dream to see Eddie Wen' Go as a live-action play and that day has finally come!

    Coinciding with Hōkūleʻa's round-the-world voyage, this imaginative production uses hula, chant, masks and puppetry to bring the book to life. Two performances will be held on Friday, September 19, 7pm and Saturday, September 20, 2pm. To purchase tickets or to learn about student matinee performances, visit the Hawai'i Theatre website.

    Ticket prices: General admission, $10; HTC members/seniors/military, $7; Students, $5; Children under 4, free.Copies of Eddie Wen' Go will be available for purchase at the shows, and Marion Lyman-Mersereau will be on hand to sign books.

  • FOOD FRIDAY: A Porky Pair from From Kau Kau to Cuisine

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and NowFrom Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu of KTA SuperStores and Jason Takemura of Pagoda Floating Restaurant and Hukilau Honolulu, is a unique culinary guide drawing out the connections between old, plantation-era favorites and new, innovative modern cuisine. While food historian Arnold provides a background to what, why and how we eat in Hawaii, Derek and Jason team up to present 30 pairs of recipes. Each pair matches a “Then” dish from Derek—a classic plantation or traditional local-style favorite—with a “Now” dish from Jason—a reinterpretation of Derek’s version or a new creation drawn from the same ingredients or cooking style.

    On this Food Friday, we present a pork-tastic pair: Classic Shoyu Pork from Derek and a modern spin on the manapua from Jason.

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: Shoyu Pork and Pork Belly Bao Bun Sliders

    Shoyu Pork by George Yoshida and Derek Kurisu

    I remember my family receiving pork from the “buta kau kau man” who would come to neighborhood homes and pick up slop once or twice a week (see page 30). In return, he would periodically bring everybody a piece of pork as a way of saying thanks. That pork was so goodI really looked forward to it! To this day, I love local pork, which is leaner and more flavorful than Mainland pork. This is another recipe I learned from my buddy, George Yoshida. Here on the Big Island, a lot of our plantations grew sugar. But on the other islands, they grew a lot of pineapple. The flavor goes well with pork, so we often use it for cooking with ham or spare ribs. I like to use it for shoyu pork—with the shoyu, it makes a unique flavor and the juice helps tenderize the pork. -DK

    • 5 pounds pork belly (or boneless pork shoulder roast, cut in half)
    • 1 cup shoyu
    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1 cup pineapple juice
    • 5 slices fresh ginger

    In a deep pot, cover pork with water and boil for 1 hour. Discard water and rinse pork. Slice pork into 2-inch pieces and, in the same pot, combine with remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil and continue to simmer, about 45 minutes, until tender.

    Serves 8 to 10.

     

    Braised Pork Belly Bao Bun “Sliders” by Jason Takemura

    Growing up in Hawai‘i, everybody loves to eat manapua. They’re sort of like SPAM® musubi—the kind of grab-and-go food perfect for a snack or quick meal. Instead of serving plain manapua in the restaurant, we put this spin on the classic Island favorite. We started with some of the Asian ingredients and flavors that I learned at Chai’s and adapted them to our needs and tastes. The secret is our braised pork, which goes really well with the bao buns. Sliders are really popular these days—no need to cut them in half or anything, they’re all individual servings. -JT

    • 2 pounds pork belly, skin removed
    • Pork Marinade (recipe follows)
    • 4 tablespoons hoisin sauce
    • 2 teaspoons sriracha (or other hot sauce )
    • ½ cup Kim Chee, chopped (see recipe, page 154)
    • 1 cup thinly sliced won bok
    • ½ cup finely julienned Fuji apple
    • ½ cup julienned green onions (reserve bottoms and stems for marinade)
    • 12 fresh bao buns, steamed and warmed

    Pork Marinade

    • 1½ cups shoyu
    • 1 cup sugar
    • ½ cup water
    • 2 pieces star anise
    • 1 3-inch piece ginger
    • 4 stalks green onion, white part only
    • 5 cloves garlic, whole
    • Pinch crushed red chili flakes

    Cut pork belly into a 2-inch by 2-inch by 8-inch block. Combine marinade ingredients and marinate pork overnight (8 to 12 hours), turning the pork over every 4 hours.

    Preheat oven to 325˚F. Transfer pork and marinade into an oven-safe pan. Cover pan with foil. Place in the oven and braise for 3 hours. Remove from oven, remove foil and allow to cool, with the braising liquid, before refrigerating until ready to use. Remove cold pork from the liquid and slice crosswise ¼-inch thick. Reserve braising liquid.

    In a sauce pan, heat sliced pork belly in the reserved braising liquid. Mix hoisin and sriracha together and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix won bok, apples and chopped kim chee together. Spread 1 teaspoon of hoisin-sriracha sauce in each warm, softened bao bun. Place 2 to 3 slices of pork per bun, topped with the kim chee slaw. Garnish with green onions.

    Makes 12 sliders.

    For more delicious pairings like this one, pick up a copy of From Kau Kau to Cuisine at our online store or your local bookshop. Go grind!

    From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now
    by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu and Jason Takemura
    Hardcover, 196 pages

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  • Two For Tuesday Deal for July 29, 2014!

    TWOFORTUESDAYOn August 9, 1997, U.S. District Judge Samuel P. King and four other steadfast individuals— Gladys Brandt, Judge Walter Heen, Monsignor Charles Kekumano and Randy Roth—signed their names to the landmark “Broken Trust” essay published in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin newspaper. Nine years later, in 2006, Judge King and Roth published the award-winning book Broken Trust: Greed, Mismanagement, & Political Manipulation at America's Largest Charitable Trust. To this day, “Broken Trust” remains one of the biggest cases of trust mismanagement and certainly the most scandalous and controversial periods in the history of the Kamehameha Schools.

    Just ahead of the anniversary of the publication of the original essay, this month’s Two For Tuesday deal offers a look at the years of crisis from a unique point of view, an oral history document compiled by noted historian Gavan Daws, Wayfinding Through the Storm: Speaking Truth to Power at Kamehameha Schools 1993-1999. The other half of this month’s pairing is Broken Trust author Judge Sam King’s own memoir, Judge Sam King: A Memoir.

    Two For Tuesday Deal: $22 for Wayfinding Through The Storm and Judge Sam King. Together, these books have a retail value of $47.90. That’s a 55% discount on a set of books that provide a remarkable historical record of Hawai‘i.

    Bonus Offer: Want more Hawai‘i history? Former governor Ben Cayetano, whose tenure included directing the investigation of the Bishop Estate trustees, offers a riveting look at Hawai‘i yesterday and today in his book, BEN: A Memoir. Add it to your purchase for just $10 (a 50% discount).

    GET THE DEAL

    Two for Tuesday Deal

  • Watermark Authors’ Summer Reading List (Part 2)

    Part Two of our authors’ summer reading list includes fourteen more titles, picked by five of our authors. These are selections that they’ve got on their own to-read piles or recommend adding to yours. If you missed Part One last week, click here to check out the first eight picks.

    Wanda Adams (editor, A Sweet Dash of Aloha and A Splash of Aloha):

    WandaAdams_webWanda is a VERY prolific reader and ardent supporter of the annual Friends of the Library book sale! She gave us a lengthy list of suggestions that she's recently finished reading, now that she's moving on to working on her FotL haul:

    Hawai‘i: A Novel by Mark Panek (Lo‘ihi Press, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why I recommend it: Mark Panek is my favorite among local authors because of his historical bent.

     

    Adé: A Love Story by Rebeccah Walker (Little A / New Harvest, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Read it if you're looking for: A romance with depths.

     

    A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin (Bantam, 2002 reprint)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why I was interested in reading it: To see how it matches with the TV show. I think it’s just as good, if not better.

     

    The French House by Don Wallace (Sourcebooks, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it was on my reading list: Considering it for a possible book review article.

     

    A Shark Going Inland is My Chief by Pat Kirsch (University of California Press)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I enjoyed it: I love science and Pat's a friend.

     

    Clear Englebert (Feng Shui for Hawaii and Feng Shui for Hawaii Gardens):

    Author and feng shui expert Clear EnglebertOn my list (currently reading): Landscaping with Conifers and Ginkgo for the Southeast by Tom Cox & John Ruter (University Press of Florida, 2013)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I’m an avid gardener myself and this book will be of interest to other local gardeners. It's published by the University Press of Florida, and when they publish a gardening book, Hawaii gardeners should take note. Several times a year I write reviews of tropical horticulture books for the West Hawaii Today newspaper, and this book will be included in my next review. It's a superior book with many color photographs and the plants that are recommended will do well in Hawaii (somewhere). I recommend prostrate conifers (such as juniper) for many local gardens as graceful and unique groundcovers.

     

    I suggest: My Ideal Bookshelf by Thessaly La Force, editor & Jane Mount, illustrator (Little, Brown and Company, 2012)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: I borrowed this book to read, and just finished it. It's a very unique book—every other page is some expert's favorite dozen (or so) books. The text on the facing page is by the expert (such as Malcolm Gladwell) explaining why those books were chosen. The authors invite people to photograph their own favorite books and say why those books were picked. This book provided much valuable research for a presentation I’m working on, "How to Build and Maintain a Home Library in Hawaii," as well as inspiring me with many new book suggestions for my personal reading. I highly recommend it to everyone.

     

    Darien Gee (Writing the Hawaii Memoir; contributor, Don’t Look Back):

    DarienGee_headshotOn my reading list: Daughters of Fire by Tom Peek (Koa Books, 2012)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Fiction

    Why it’s on my list: This has been on my to-be-read pile for a year, and I'm looking forward to finally having the time to read it! Written by fellow Big Island author and writing instructor Tom Peek, Daughters of Fire looks like a gripping summer read.

     

    I suggest: The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work by Shawn Achor (Crown Business, 2010)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: The one key to success that everyone overlooks—your ability to find happiness in what you do—leads to more happiness and success in other areas of your life. Great case studies, information and inspiration. I highly recommend for anyone looking to make changes this summer.

     

    Fran Kirk (The Society of Seven)

    I suggest: Ghost Train to the Eastern Star (Houghton Mifflin, 2008) and The Happy Isles of Oceania (Putnam Pub Group, 1992) both by Paul Theroux

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why I recommend it: Paul is a GREAT WRITER. Couldn't get enough of him so I read two in a row.

     

    Dr. Rosalie Tatsuguchi (Why Smart People Do the Same Dumb Things):

    1-Tatsuguchi-web--0017-retouchedOn my list (currently reading): The Complete Book of Five Rings: Miyamoto Musashi, annotated and edited by Kenji Tokitsu (Shambala Publications, 2010)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I'm reading this edition because it’s more complete than other editions of Five RingsFive Rings still has so much influence on our cultural thinking and actions—not just Japanese. It has a lot of relevance for my new book, which I’m currently working on, Why Smart Men Do the Same Dumb Things.

     

    Also on my reading list: A Fighting Chance by Elizabeth Warrren (Metropolitan Books, 2014)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I want to read this because I admire Elizabeth Warren and want to understand how she thinks and how she matches her actions to her thoughts.

     

    Also on my reading list: Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power by Rachel Maddow (Crown, 2012, hardcover; Broadway Books, 2013, softcover)

    Fiction or non-fiction: Non-fiction

    Why it’s on my list: I love Rachel Maddow on MSNBC and wanted to understand how she collects and analyzes data, and puts it all together.

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