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  • NEW RELEASE: Campaign Hawaii - An Inside Look at Politics in Paradise

    CH_BannerOn the eve of 2016’s hotly contested state and national elections, Watermark Publishing of Honolulu announces the release of Campaign Hawai‘i: An Inside Look at Politics in Paradise by political veteran Rick Tsujimura.

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    For more than a half-century, Tsujimura has been one of the true believers who work behind the scenes to get out the vote—the campaign staff and volunteers who canvass neighborhoods and stuff envelopes and hold signs at the side of the road, tirelessly supporting their candidates during election season. In Campaign Hawai‘i, Tsujimura shares stories of life on the campaign trail—the backroom strategizing, ethnic voting and mud-slinging, the exhilaration of victory and the disappointment of defeat on election night. It’s an inside view sharpened by Tsujimura’s long years spent toiling in the trenches for Jack Burns, George Ariyoshi, John Craven and Ben Cayetano, and running campaigns for Eileen Anderson, Arnold Morgado, Jeremy Harris, Randy Iwase, Neil Abercrombie and Kirk Caldwell.

    “I hope these stories bring some life to events that voters may have heard about, but whose details have faded with time,” the author says. “This book is not so much a historical account of events, but a record of the lessons learned during my years of exposure to the political process in Hawai‘i.” Campaign Hawai‘i is a primer for campaign workers and candidates alike, and a great read for anyone who follows politics, Hawaiian-style. “With equal measures of intelligence and humility, Tsujimura explicates both victories and defeats. Students of politics, take out your notebooks and sharpen your pencils,” advises Dan Boylan, Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Hawai‘i − West O‘ahu.

    BNBookFairVoucher_CHRick Tsujimura earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science from the University of Hawai‘i and a Juris Doctor from the Loyola Law School. He is of counsel to the law firm Ashford & Wriston and serves on the boards of the Queens Health Systems, the East-West Center and Global Hope Networks International in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Talk campaigning with Rick Tsujimura at his first book signing event at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana, on Thursday, December 1, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. A portion of sales during the evening will be donated to PBS Hawai‘i. Mention Campaign Hawai‘i or bring in a copy of this voucher.

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  • Brother Noland's Hō‘ea Initiative Tracking Camp - Summer 2015

    The Hawaiian Survival Handbook is the essential textbook for Brother Noland's Hō‘ea Initiative Tracking Camps. The next camp starts May 31, and there are still spots available. (Children and adults welcome.) Read on for more details about what these camps entail and info on how to sign up for the upcoming camp.

     

    With nature as the classroom, the Hō‘ea Initiative provides various training opportunities for youth and adults in a wide range of life skills, including wilderness survival, nature awareness, tracking, cultural appreciation and much more. These interactive camps and sessions are designed to immerse participants in nature while increasing self-reliance and appreciation of the natural world by introducing participants to the resources found in nature and teaching them how to recognize and utilize those resources. Participants learn a variety of skills to live off the land and ocean. Early Hawaiians lived and existed in total balance and harmony with all things in nature and their resources were nurtured and never depleted.

    The early Hawaiians knew and followed the seasons and cycles of all things in the universe following a spiritual protocol we call aloha...permission, conservation, preservation...sharing and sustaining life not just for one’s self but for the greater community. The Hō‘ea Initiative programs are a passionate effort to provide universal understandings inside all of us through indigenous knowledge and principals found outside in the natural world. We provide the opportunity to increase one’s peripheral vision and strengthen his or her whole mind-body-spirit completeness.

    Brother Noland and his Hōe‘a Initiative crew: HIT trainers Palakiko and Jenny Yagodich, and junior trackers Karina Jacang and Alex Johnstone. Brother Noland and his Hōe‘a Initiative crew: HIT trainers Palakiko and Jenny Yagodich, and junior trackers Karina Jacang and Alex Johnstone.

    All of Brother Noland’s Hō‘ea Initiative camps and sessions follow the same core format. Although the core format is always the same, we are also free with our planned curriculum so that we are able to move and adjust with the environment around us. Sometimes admiring an ‘ohana of monk seals or a visit from a pueo takes us away from our agenda…we allow freedom for these types of gifts from nature.

    Summer 2015 Tracking Camp Details:

    Adult Camp - Sunday, May 31st  2015 – Wednesday, June 3rd 2015

    Youth Camp – Wednesday, June 3rd 2015 – Friday, June 5th 2015

    **Adults have the option to stay the entire time, the 31st – 5th

    Fees/Costs:

    Airfare is the responsibility of each participant and the camp/session fee is $300 per person ($500 for adults staying for the entire camp).  This fee covers ground transportation on Moloka‘i, meals, activities and community speakers. Payment is due in cash or by check on made out to Hoea Initiative  by Monday, May 4th.

    Travel Reservations – Reservations are the responsibility of each participant. 

    • Please plan on arriving on Moloka‘i the afternoon of May 31st.
    • If you leave on the 3rd, please plan an early flight as we will be picking up the Junior Trackers on the first flights.
    • Please plan to leave the evening of the 5th.

    More details about specific flights will be available as we move closer to camp dates.

    Additional Details:

    We are asking that each participant bring the following with you to Moloka‘i:

    •   Your signed waiver
    •   Something organic to add to the food table (fruit or veggies from your yard or something similar)

    Contact Hō‘ea Initiative at hoeainitiative@aol.com or (808) 729-8293 to reserve your spot and obtain the necessary forms and detailed information.

    The Hawaiian Survival Handbook
    by Brother Noland
    Hardcover; 164 pp.

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  • Make a Plan to Start—and Finish!—Your Memoir

    Have you ever thought of writing your own memoir? Or preserving your family’s history by recording your relatives’ life stories? Many of us have, but so few of us do it. Why? Maybe we think we’re not “good enough” at writing. Or perhaps we’re scared to reveal family secrets. You might have started and somehow just never finished.

    Bestselling author Darien Gee understands how hard it can be to start and finish writing a memoir. In her book, Writing the Hawai‘i Memoir: Advice and Exercises to Help You Tell Your Story, she provides concise, step-by-step guidance for writers of all experience levels. Even better, her book goes beyond “how to” and gets you to completion through exercises and encouragement. The emphasis is not on publication—though if that is your end goal, you’ll find pointers for that, too—but on finishing your memoir so it can be shared with others.

    9781935690535Here, Darien shares some writing wisdom, beginning with why we might want to write a memoir in the first place:

    Sharing our lives opens us up. It connects us. It helps us (as the writer) to make sense of things, to celebrate moments that might otherwise be lost, to remember what matters most. It helps us (as the reader) to see that we’re not alone, that our lives are both personal and universal, that the human spirit is deeper and more profound than we may remember when we’re trying to pay our bills or care for a sick child or parent. We get to be a part of another person’s experience. We can share the joys, the laughter, the chicken skin coincidences, the sorrow, the grief. We can take what we learn and apply it to our own lives. Then we can turn it around and do the same for others.

    In Hawaiian, mana‘o means several things—thought, belief, intention, ideas, desire. Your mana‘o emanates from who you are as a person. It is individual and unique. You get to claim your life, your experiences, your story. What you put down on the page is up to you. You are the only one who can put the words down in that way. But how to get started…?

    It’s actually as simple as this:

    Start Wherever You Are.

    Writing is ready when you are, wherever you are. All you need are the thoughts in your head, something to capture them—pen and paper, typewriter, computer, voice recorder, whatever suits you best—and a place to sit still and just do it.

    Set Goals.

    The key is to start simple. There’s nothing wrong with setting an ambitious goal, but you want to set yourself up for success. That means having a clear idea of what you want to achieve and establishing a rhythm that works with the realities of your life. Twenty minutes or three pages a day may not sound like much, but you’ll know when you’re ready for more. Better to start at a place that feels easy than one that feels too hard.

    Establish a Routine.

    Many people approach writing a book in a haphazard way. They sit down, write a few words, organize their desk, get up for a cup of coffee, write some more, take a bathroom break, check their email, do some laundry, make a sandwich, then throw in the towel for the rest of the day because it’s time to pick up the kids or catch the evening news. There’s nothing wrong with this, but if you want to write a book—more importantly, if you want to finish writing a book—you greatly increase your chances by establishing a routine.

    Set a Deadline and Finish What You Start.

    Do you want to write your memoir, or do you want to write and finish your memoir? It may seem like an odd question, but there are lots of writers who write without ever finishing their manuscript. Setting a deadline isn’t meant to quash your creative spirit. It provides focus, and when the brain puts its full attention on something, it filters out everything else. You can move the deadline up or push it back, but you must set a deadline when you begin. Without it, your writing project will be unmoored, left to float about and be pushed around by circumstance or whimsy. The brain loves parameters, and it will rally all your resources around it. The time to do this isn’t when you’re midway through the project, but before you begin. If you want to have a finished manuscript in your hands, set a deadline.

    Even boiled down to four simple steps, the idea of writing something as “serious” as a memoir may seem daunting. A task for “a real writer,” not you. But if you know how to write, you are a writer. It’s as simple as that. You may be a terrible speller, suffer at the thought of writing a single paragraph or hate reading anything over two pages, but you are a writer. And you already possess all the material you need—your memories. While you may want to look for ways to develop and improve your basic skills (such as punctuation, grammar, story structure), the first thing you must work on is your own thoughts, especially the negative ones. This trumps everything else, because tormented, unhappy writers are no fun at all. Don’t put yourself down. Be kind. Trust your words. Trust your desire to write. I know you can do it—shouldn’t you, too?

     * * * * *

    DarienGee_headshot Author Darien Gee wants to help YOU with your memoir!

    Need more help? Join Darien Gee at her upcoming intensive workshop through Pacific New Media or free lecture at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana.

    • Pacific New Media Workshop. “Writing the Memoir: A One-Day Intensive with Darien Gee.” Saturday, March 21. 9am – 4pm. UH Mānoa. Workshop fee of $125 includes a copy of Writing the Hawai‘i Memoir. Optional one-on-one 25-minute consults available following the workshop ($45). outreach.hawaii.edu/pnm/programs/2015/EVENT-L13668.asp or 808-956-8400 to register.

     

    • Lecture & Book Signing. Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana, Sunday, March 22. 1pm – 2pm. Bring your laptop or a pen or pencil and some paper as Darien will lead a short writing exercise to get you inspired! A portion of proceeds from books purchased on this day help benefit PBS Hawaii and their “New Home” Campaign.

     

    PBSBookFairCoupon_Darien

    Writing the Hawai‘i Memoir: Advice and Exercises to Help You Tell Your Story

    by Darien Gee
    Softcover, 144 pages

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    Excerpted from Writing the Hawai‘i Memoir by Darien Gee. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information retrieval systems, without prior written permission from the publisher, except for brief passages quoted in reviews.
  • Five Tips for Better Feng Shui

    Bestselling author and feng shui consultant Clear Englebert considers feng shui “an art, like decorating…it may not be classified as a science in the modern sense, but it teaches us to consciously notice where our attention is being drawn and what symbols are around us. This is a cross-cultural belief.” Clear specializes in offering pragmatic solutions geared particularly to address the feng shui situations and challenges particular to living in Hawai‘i. His books, Feng Shui for Hawai‘i and Feng Shui for Hawai‘i Gardens offer a wealth of such advice in concise, simple language with hundreds of illustrative photos and drawings.

    Here, he shares five tips for better feng shui as we look forward to the new Year of the Ram. Get more tips from Clear at his free lectures and special intensive classes (nominal fee) offered on O‘ahu at the end of this month. (Schedule posted after the tips.)

    1)   Positioning the Bed

    This is literally a fundamental step when evaluating feng shui in your home—your bed is where you sleep and recharge your body’s energy. Place it so that the head of the bed is against a solid wall and, most importantly, so that you can easily see toward the doorway of the bedroom. The idea that someone could approach your resting place unseen is not good for positive energy. However, make sure that the bed is not directly in line with the doorway—that’s too much energy coming straight into the room and hitting you as you rest. You especially do not want the foot of the bed aimed out the door. That’s called the “coffin position” because coffins are carried out feet first.

    2)   The “Money Corner”

    Here's an example of a fountain from hayneedle.com that I shared on my Pinterest board. (Follow me at pinterest.com/fungshway) I think it's incredibly beautiful, though sadly quite expensive. -CE

     

     

    The area associated with finance is located in the far left corner of any room or of the whole house. The ideal item to place here is a fountain—water represents wealth (in Hawaii, wai is water and waiwai means wealth; it’s no coincidence!). The fountain must be running and kept going constantly while you are home and awake. You can turn it off at night while you sleep or while you’re at work. (A timer is good for this.) If it is a model with a light below the water, the light should be turned off—light (fire) below water is an unnatural situation. It only occurs when you have lava flowing beneath the surface of the ocean, a dangerous setting with opposing elements coming together, and therefore is symbolic of argument and chaos. If you cannot have a fountain, a photo or painting of flowing water (a waterfall or river) is a good alternative.

    3)   The “Relationship Corner”

    The area pertaining to relationships is located in the far right corner. Keep items there in pairs or groups, like two figurines together, not singular objects—no paintings or photographs of one lonely hula dancer or solitary palm tree. Also, artwork or other items placed there should be somewhat romantic, and include a bit of pink—the color of love. Couples should both like any decoration placed in this corner. You don’t want something in your relationship corner that one person dislikes.

    4)   Using feng shui to attract a relationship

    USPS: Duke Kahanamoku stamp One of my clients pasted this stamp next to her door in the appropriate location to attract a romantic relationship into her life. - CE 

    Start with Tip #3, plus put an image outside your front door that is of the same gender as the person you are hoping to attract. (In this instance, you just want a single figure.) If you are looking for a man, put a masculine image on the right side of the door. If you are looking for a woman, put a feminine image on the left side of the door. (Right and left respective to you standing outside looking at the front door.) The image can be a photograph, painting, sculpture or even a postage stamp. I had one client who pasted up a small stamp featuring Duke Kahanamoku—the next time I talked to her, she couldn’t stop raving about her handsome, sexy, athletic new boyfriend, just what you’d expect from an image like that!

    5)   Feng shui and health

    There are two things I recommend right away when asked about health and feng shui. First: Get rid of clutter. I have discovered that in homes where a person is ill, such as a diagnosis of cancer, clutter has been prevalent for some time. Clutter prevents movement and circulation of energy in your home. The concept resonates in your body. Second: Do not keep furniture with sharp right angles close to the bed. The corners on bedside tables should be round or rounded (angles larger than 90 degrees). Sharp angles direct harsh energy; they are called “poison arrows” or shar chi. If such a corner is near your bed, in feng shui terms, you are being stabbed as you sleep. Once I explained this to an elderly woman I consulted for, she took out her saw and sawed off the offending corner right in front of me!

    * * * * *

    Free Library Lecture dates, times and locations:

    • Wednesday, Feb. 25, 6:00 pm at Waipahu Library (808-675-0358)
    • Saturday, Feb. 28, 10:30 am, at Mililani Library (808-627-7470)
    • Saturday, Feb. 28, 2:00 pm, at Waikiki-Kapahulu Library (808-733-8488)
    • Monday, March 2, 6:00 pm, at Kaimuki Library (808-733-8422)

    Each lecture will last one hour and discuss a number of topics, including mauka/makai orientation of the home and its land; the significance of water features and fountains; clutter and how to eliminate it (a common problem in O‘ahu’s apartments and townhomes); interior features (fans, open beams, etc.); furniture selection (patterns, color and placement); and the importance of doors and windows. Learn why O‘ahu has the most favorable feng shui and about the commonality between the Hawaiian and Chinese cultures’ connection between fresh water and prosperity.

    At each of these talks Clear’s books, Feng Shui for Hawai‘i and Feng Shui for Hawai‘i Gardens, both published by Watermark Publishing, will be available for purchase; 30% of each purchase goes to the Friends of the Library.

    Special Classes: Feng Shui for Love & Money

    Class fee, $10 each. This class explains how to use and enhance the two powerful back corners of a space: the Relationship Corner in the far right, and the Wealth Corner in the far left. It will also explain various other aspects of feng shui concerned with harmony and prosperity.

    • Friday, Feb. 27, 6:30-8:30 pm at Bodhi Tree Dharma Center

    654A North Judd St. Walk-ins welcome.

    • Sunday, March 1, 3:00-5:00 pm at Highline Kitchen Systems

    1276 Young St., between Pi‘ikoi and Ke‘eaumoku. Pre-registration required, call 808-328-0329.

    Special Class: Feng Shui for Real Estate

    Class fee, $10 each. This class is particularly intended for real estate agents and anyone buying or selling property. Renters will also find the advice on buying applicable in their search for space. This portion of the class covers how to select a future home/property with positive feng shui energy. The selling portion of the class explains how to sell property more quickly and profitably using feng shui principles.

    • Thursday, February 26, 6:00-8:00 pm at Highline Kitchen Systems

    1276 Young St., between Pi‘ikoi and Ke‘eaumoku. Pre-registration required, call 808-328-0329.

    Clear Englebert has practiced and taught feng shui in Hawai‘i and California since 1995. A recognized feng shui expert with five published books to his credit, he has been featured on television programs and in print media. He teaches feng shui at various venues and offers consultations throughout Hawai‘i. For more information visit his website, www.fungshway.com.

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